Silly Texas man who likes Star Trek, Batman, Doctor Who, Star Wars, and 50s schlock. I'm also a big fan of Bettie Page, Elvis, old Hollywood glamour, and most retro. I'm easily distracted by bright shiny things. Or boobs. Or bright shiny boobs.

 

classictrek:

A second season publicity photo in which it looks like Nichelle Nichols and William Shatner are posing for a Starfleet recruitment brochure.

classictrek:

A second season publicity photo in which it looks like Nichelle Nichols and William Shatner are posing for a Starfleet recruitment brochure.

classictrek:

Some very hard-to-find snapshots of Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley and William Shatner during the filming of “Spectre of the Gun.” These were featured in the excellent Pioneers of Television episode about science fiction programming in the 1960s.

classictrek:

Season 2 publicity photo featuring William Shatner giving you the bedroom eyes while the Enterprise averts her gaze.

classictrek:

Season 2 publicity photo featuring William Shatner giving you the bedroom eyes while the Enterprise averts her gaze.

classictrek:

A publicity photo from “Miri.”
18-year-old Kim Darby played the title character (who’s actually 14) after three years of working on shows such as Dr. Kildare and The Fugitive. She would later work with James Doohan in Bus Riley’s Back In Town (1965) and The People, a sci-fi flick starring William Shatner in 1972, but her most notable work is True Grit, where she took second billing to John Wayne.

classictrek:

A publicity photo from “Miri.”

18-year-old Kim Darby played the title character (who’s actually 14) after three years of working on shows such as Dr. Kildare and The Fugitive. She would later work with James Doohan in Bus Riley’s Back In Town (1965) and The People, a sci-fi flick starring William Shatner in 1972, but her most notable work is True Grit, where she took second billing to John Wayne.

classictrek:

Another second season publicity photo, featuring Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner as Spock and Captain James T. Kirk.

classictrek:

Another second season publicity photo, featuring Leonard Nimoy and William Shatner as Spock and Captain James T. Kirk.

classictrek:

Behind-the-scenes photos from Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan, from The Papers of Nicholas Meyer Collection currently held in the Special Collections Department at the University of Iowa Library in Iowa City.

classictrek:

A behind-the-scenes photo from the first day of filming for “Where No Man Has Gone Before.”

Roddenberry had wanted James Goldstone (a highly-regarded TV director with stints on Perry Mason, Rawhide, The Fugitive along with Roddenberry’s own The Lieutenant) to helm the first pilot, but wasn’t able to secure him. After all, a man who had a good reputation could have it destroyed with one lousy pilot and like the rest of Hollywood, he was a bit skittish about science-fiction at the time. (That said, he was happy to recommend his friend Robert H. Justman as an Associate Producer for the show early on, which worked out very well indeed.)

When NBC told Roddenberry he would have a second shot, he again approached Goldstone, who agreed to direct the second pilot.

"There had been several problems with the "The Cage." One of them was that it cost so much money and the other that it took so long to shoot," Goldstone said in an interview. "One of the requisites put on the second pilot was to shoot it in eight days which would then prove that a weekly series could be done in six or seven days. The other requisite was that NBC very much wanted something that could be ‘commercial’ against the police shows and all the other action things that were then on television. "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was not so much a pilot as it was an example of how we could go on a weekly level."

classictrek:

A behind-the-scenes photo from the first day of filming for “Where No Man Has Gone Before.”

Roddenberry had wanted James Goldstone (a highly-regarded TV director with stints on Perry Mason, Rawhide, The Fugitive along with Roddenberry’s own The Lieutenant) to helm the first pilot, but wasn’t able to secure him. After all, a man who had a good reputation could have it destroyed with one lousy pilot and like the rest of Hollywood, he was a bit skittish about science-fiction at the time. (That said, he was happy to recommend his friend Robert H. Justman as an Associate Producer for the show early on, which worked out very well indeed.)

When NBC told Roddenberry he would have a second shot, he again approached Goldstone, who agreed to direct the second pilot.

"There had been several problems with the "The Cage." One of them was that it cost so much money and the other that it took so long to shoot," Goldstone said in an interview. "One of the requisites put on the second pilot was to shoot it in eight days which would then prove that a weekly series could be done in six or seven days. The other requisite was that NBC very much wanted something that could be ‘commercial’ against the police shows and all the other action things that were then on television. "Where No Man Has Gone Before" was not so much a pilot as it was an example of how we could go on a weekly level."